Melissa Barth - Freetown, MA Real Estate, Lakeville, MA Real Estate, Berkley, MA Real Estate


Millennials, i.e. individuals between the ages of 18 and 29 years old, often grab life by the horns. However, when it comes to getting ready for a move, Millennials often encounter problems along the way.

Fortunately, we're here to help Millennials who recently bought or sold a house discover what it takes to complete a successful move.

Let's take a look at three moving tips that every Millennial needs to know.

1. Get a Head Start on Your Move

Let's face it – the stress associated with moving can be overwhelming. And in some cases, it may lead Millennials to wait until the last minute to start packing.

Procrastination is never a good idea, particularly when it comes to moving. If you get an early start on your move, you can enjoy a seamless transition from one address to the next.

2. Pick Up Plenty of Packing Supplies

If you own a wide range of books, clothing and DVDs, there is no need to worry. Pick up plenty of packing supplies prior to moving day, and you can safeguard your belongings during your move.

Moving boxes are essential and come in a variety of sizes. You can always purchase moving boxes; or, you may be able to pick up boxes for free from a local grocery store or retailer.

In addition, be sure to pick up packing tape, bubble wrap and other packing supplies. With the right packing supplies at your disposal, you'll have no trouble getting your belongings ready for moving day.

3. Hire a Professional Moving Company

When it comes to moving, there is no need to work alone. Luckily, many moving companies are available to help Millennials complete a successful relocation.

Reach out to a variety of moving companies in your area – you'll be glad you did. If you discuss your moving budget and requirements with several moving companies, you should be able to find a professional mover that meets or exceeds your expectations.

Of course, if you need assistance as you search for a moving company, you may want to discuss your options with a real estate agent as well.

A real estate agent can put a Millennial in touch with the best moving companies in any city or town. By doing so, this housing market professional will make it simple for you to get the help that you need for your move.

Lastly, any time you need to buy or sell a house, it pays to hire a real estate agent. This housing market professional will learn about your homebuying or home selling goals and ensure you can achieve your desired results. Plus, if you ever have homebuying or home selling questions, a real estate agent is happy to respond to them.

Ready to relocate to a new address? Use the aforementioned moving tips, and any Millennial can pack up his or her belongings and enjoy a quick, easy move.


As a first-time homebuyer, it is easy to feel plenty of optimism as you search for your dream residence. And if you find your ideal house, it may seem likely that a home seller will accept your offer on the residence right away.

However, it is important to remember that a home seller might reject a first-time homebuyer's proposal, regardless of whether this homebuyer submits a competitive offer. In this scenario, a homebuyer needs to know how to move forward and continue to pursue his or her perfect residence.

What should a first-time homebuyer do if a home seller rejects an offer on a home? Here are three tips that every first-time homebuyer needs to know.

1. Learn from the Experience

If a home seller rejects an offer on a house, there is no need to worry. In fact, a first-time homebuyer may be able to resubmit an offer and find out why a home seller rejected his or her initial offer.

For example, a first-time homebuyer may lack financing at the time that he or she submits an offer on a house. But if a homebuyer gets approved for a mortgage and returns with a new offer, he or she may be more likely than before to gain a home seller's approval.

On the other hand, a homebuyer should be ready to move forward with a home search if necessary. Thus, if a home offer is rejected, try not to get too emotional. Instead, a homebuyer should be prepared to reenter the housing market and start his or her search for the perfect home from stage one.

2. Don't Dwell on the Past

For a first-time homebuyer, it can be frustrating and annoying to conduct a home search, find the ideal home and receive a rejection after a proposal to buy the house is submitted. But there is no reason to dwell on the past for too long, as doing so may force a homebuyer to miss out on opportunities to pursue other residences.

Remember, the housing market often features dozens of outstanding houses to match all homebuyers' price ranges. This means if you receive a rejection on one home proposal, you can always restart a home search. And ultimately, a diligent homebuyer should have no trouble discovering a terrific residence, even if his or her initial offer on a residence is rejected.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent is a housing market expert who understands what it takes to submit a competitive offer on a house. Therefore, he or she will help you prepare a fair offer on a home before you submit it.

If a home offer is rejected, a real estate agent can help you alleviate stress. This housing market professional may be able to explain why the offer was rejected and help you plan your next steps in the homebuying journey.

Don't worry if your first offer on a house is rejected – conversely, use these tips, and you can move one step closer to acquiring a stellar residence that matches or exceeds your expectations.


Photo by Joel Dunn via Pixabay

Your roof is an important part of your home, and for something of its size, it is surprisingly delicate. Even minor problems can have a lasting impact on the integrity of your home. Learning how to spot some of the most common problems allows you to seek out help when you need to. Any one of these signs should trigger a call to a roofing company, just in case: 

You see damage: You should never climb out on the roof yourself, but if you see visible signs of damage, you should call a roofing company. They can perform a full inspection and make sure that your roof is in the best possible shape. Damage doesn't mean a huge gaping hole; missing shingles, shingles that are curled or curved up and split shingles can lead to more extensive damage in a short period of time. 

There are leaks: If your roof is leaking, then you definitely need assistance. Even a small trickle means moisture is where it shouldn't be -- and that will lead to more extensive damage. A drip or leak could also lead to mold growth and impact the air quality in your home. 

You hear rodents: Squirrels, raccoons and other rodents love your roof and attic, particularly in the colder months. If you hear the pitter patter of little feet, then one or more of these critters could have moved in, damaging your roof in the process. For safety reasons and to protect your roof, you should have any animal signs investigated right away. 

Your neighbors have roof problems: If you live in a community where the homes were all built from the same materials at the same time, then those materials could begin to fail at the same time, too. If you notice a lot of homes in the neighborhood getting repairs, it is a good idea to get an inspection soon, just in case. 

You're planning on moving: If you want to sell your home soon, a roof inspection lets you find problems early and make any needed repairs before you list your home. This can prevent problems at closing and ensure you get the best possible price for your home. 

Roof issues can go from minor to expensive in a flash and they won't go away on their own. If you spot one of these signs, the best thing to do is to get it repaired right away. Delay, and you could be looking at a more costly and extensive repair. 


Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

If you've recently made the decision to put your home on the market in the near future, you're probably already aware that the Millennial generation has a reputation for being a bit different from their counterparts of the past. For instance, you may have heard that this generation is putting off home ownership longer than any of their predecessors and that they've got quirky requirements such as walkable urban locations. Although you can't help where your home is situated, there are other things you can do to make your home more attractive to Millennials. Here's what you can do:

Create a Low Maintenance Yard

Although many Millennials have discovered the joy of gardening, their efforts are going more to growing at least some of their own food rather than maintaining a fussy ornamental landscape. Vast lawns don't appeal to them, and neither do high-maintenance trees and shrubbery. Consider replacing much of your lawn with a low-maintenance rock garden and eliminating any feature that requires significant time and attention.

Create an Appealing Online Presence

Millennial Buyers are far more likely to decide to view specific properties as the result of gaining a favorable impression of them online than seeing them listed in a newspaper or in a real estate agent's brochure. You'll need professional quality photographs to show off your home in its best light online, but don't stop there -- Millennials want to see videos as well. 

Create a Home Office 

A designated home office is another feature that won't fail to appeal to Millennial buyers. Many of them spend at least part of their time working from home, so if you don't already have a designated home office, consider converting one of the bedrooms to one. Choose a room with plenty of natural lighting if possible. 

Create Energy Efficiency

Eco-conscious Millennials appreciate energy efficiency because it's compatible with their principles, but because their idealism is tempered with a pragmatic side, they also appreciate the cost-savings involved with energy efficient features. Consider having solar panels, on-demand hot water heaters, or other green features installed. 

Create a Smart Home

As the first generation completely raised in the digital age, many Millennials consider smart home technology to be more of a necessity than a luxury. Temperature modulation, security, and lighting are three of the most common in-home smart technologies, but they can also be used to water the lawn and garden area, activate laundry machines, and put cleaning robots to work. 

It's also a good idea to be prepared to speak at some length with Millennials come to see your home about the quality and availability of WiFi service. Remembering that their generation may have different needs and preferences than you will help ensure smooth sailing after you put your home on the market. 


Photo by Andrey_Popov via Shutterstock

Is your house leaky? According to the EPA (US Environmental Protection Agency), household water leaks account for up to a trillion gallons of water wasted each year. According to their calculations, the average home leaks about ten thousand gallons annually or more than 90 gallons every single day. So how do you tell if your home is leaking?

First, pull out your water bills from the past year. Organize them by the months of colder weather when you’ll use less water for landscaping purposes and hotter weather when you’ll use more. In the winter months, December through February, the monthly average for a family of four should be under 12,000 gallons. If it’s more than that, you may have a leak.

Where does the leak come from?

The most common source of leaks is a worn toilet flapper or a dripping faucet. When you hear a hissing sound from the toilet tank, or it flushes randomly, you need to update the flapper. Dripping faucets start slowly, but unless you correct the problem, the leak only gets stronger. In fact, homeowners can save around ten percent on their water bills by merely fixing a few leaking fixtures.

How do you find them?

Turn off all the running water in your home, then read your water meter. Wait for two hours with no water use and then reread the meter. If the meter changes, it’s likely that you have a leak. Note that some water utilities have electronic meters with smartphone apps so you can track water leaks while you’re away from your home.

To determine if your toilet leaks, you’ll need some food coloring. Add one to two drops to your toilet’s tank. Wait for about 10 minutes to see if any of the colored water appears in the bowl. If you see it, that means your flapper does not seal properly and needs replacing. Once you’ve determined if it’s leaking, you should make sure to flush your toilet right away to completely expel the colored water from the tank to avoid staining your toilet bowl. A leaky faucet or showerhead is more straightforward. Often, you’ll see the drip coming from the fixture. Other times you’ll see a rust stain on the sink bowl or tub from the slowly dripping water. Other leaks can come from the connectors under sinks and behind toilets. If the valves are damp it could merely be condensation, so wipe them dry and leave them exposed to the air (leave cabinet doors open). Recheck them in an hour or two. Also, check for mold or mildew build-up since damp, leaky areas promote their growth.

Another area to find a hidden leak is in your landscaping. If your grass is greener in one area, or the ground sinks in when you step on it, you may have a broken sprinkler pipe. Landscaping and sprinkler professionals can trace the leak for you so that you can have it dug up and repaired.

How do you fix them?

If you’re handy, you can purchase a new flapper seal at your local hardware or DIY store. You’ll find instructions on YouTube, other websites or you can inquire about it while in the store. Leaky showerheads and sinks might need new gaskets, so start there. If your faucet’s fittings are inside walls, or it’s a complex system such as a touchless fixture, seek professional help in tracking down the leak and replacing seals and gaskets. Some leaks in valves and pipe joints only need plumber’s tape or pipe glue, but others might require replacing. To avoid flooding your home, let a professional handle the more complicated repairs.

For a referral to a plumbing or landscaping professional near you, ask your knowledgeable real estate agent.




Loading